Tag Archives: God’s judgment

Book Announcement: The Spirit and the Lake of Fire

Congratulations to Dr. Rustin Umstattd, assistant professor of theology at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, on the publication of his new book.

The publisher’s information states, “The Holy Spirit and the Lake of Fire! What does the Spirit have to do with God’s final judgment? The Holy Spirit and God’s judgment upon sin are not two topics that are often connected, but to understand the full work of the Spirit, they need to be. It is not enough to view judgment as the work of just the Father and the Son, but in full Trinitarian fashion, it must be understood as the work of all three persons of the Trinity.
In The Spirit and the Lake of Fire Rustin Umstattd establishes the Spirit’s role in judgment by connecting several symbols that are used for both the Spirit and judgment, such as fire, God’s breath, and God’s arm. Furthermore, by examining Augustine’s position that the Spirit is the mutual-love of the Father and the Son, and Luther’s position that God’s wrath is the underside of his love, Umstattd demonstrates how one comes to the conclusion that the Spirit is operative in God’s judgment upon sin.”

The foreword was written by Dr. Malcolm B. Yarnell III and the book carries the following endorsements:

“In The Spirit and the Lake of Fire, Rustin Umstattd exposes, then fills, a gap in the fields of biblical studies and systematic theology on the work of the Holy Spirit. The author presents four biblical motifs to argue the Holy Spirit is the Father’s agent for righteous and loving judgment in the Son. I highly recommend this book.”
–Adam Harwood, New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary

“I am grateful to God to see the publication of Dr. Umstattd’s The Spirit and the Lake of Fire. It is both biblical and insightful. Reading this book will add fervency to one’s life and ministry.”
–Jason K. Allen, Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary

“The scriptures are clear–God is both Judge and just in his judgment. Yet many are content to only explore concepts of the love of God. Umstattd’s work masterfully connects readers to the full work of the Trinity in meting judgment on humanity. This is a much-needed addition to the theological conversations surrounding the role of the Holy Spirit in the Godhead.”
–John Mark Yeats, Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary

For more information or to order a copy, click here.

People God Killed: Nadab & Abihu

Every Tuesday-Friday that classes meet at New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary, its professors gather at 7:45 AM for a brief time of faculty-led devotion and prayer. I am grateful for the opportunity to begin those days by meeting with colleagues to focus our hearts and minds on the Lord. I was asked to lead devotions this week. Tuesday’s devotion is below:

The idea for the week’s theme first occurred to me more than twenty years ago, but I have never taught on this topic. The title of the series is “People God Killed.”

My aim isn’t to be sensational. The Bible contains many instances in which a person dies, and the text indicates—implicitly or explicitly—that God killed the person for his sinful actions. In each case, we can learn things both about God and to apply to our lives.

Not everyone in Scripture who sins will die immediately, not every death is attributed to a person’s sinful actions, and it would be unwise to speculate about divine causes behind deaths today. Nevertheless, the Bible includes stories of people God killed, and those accounts are worth considering.

Our first example is Nadab and Abihu. Addressing the text in full would require reading all of Leviticus 10. For our purposes, I’ll read only verses 1-3. This is from the Christian Standard Bible (CSB). Lev 10:1-3,

Aaron’s sons Nadab and Abihu each took his own firepan, put fire in it, placed incense on it, and presented unauthorized fire before the LORD, which he had not commanded them to do. Then fire came from the LORD and consumed them, and they died before the LORD. Moses said to Aaron, ‘This is what the Lord has spoken: I will demonstrate my holiness to those who are near me, and I will reveal my glory before all the people.’ And Aaron remained silent.

Nadab and Abihu presented “unauthorized fire before the LORD, which he had not commanded them to do.” It’s not entirely clear what they did wrong procedurally. What is clear is they had important roles in ministry and they failed to obey God. The fire consumed them and the Lord declared he will demonstrate his holiness to those near him and his glory to the people. What does this story teach us about God, and how can we apply it to our lives?

Early each semester in theology, I warn students of the dangers of studying theology. One of the dangers of studying God academically is familiarity. At seminary, we handle holy things. We study the holy Word of a holy God with a holy name—and we are called to live holy lives. 

Students and professors can be lulled into approaching the things of God casually because of the frequency with which we read and preach the Word, approach God in prayer, or serve others in his name. For Nadab and Abihu, familiarity with holy things led them to let down their guard and disobey God. It cost them their lives. May we guard against becoming so familiar with God that we disobey his commands.